Top Tips On How To Find A Good Landlord

Greedy Tenant Comic

A lot of my friends rent. In fact, the majority of them rent, so I’m always getting the inside scoop on how other Landlords operate. It’s always a fascinating topic for me; I never get tired of hearing about the dodgy dealings of an overweight pimple-faced greasy Landlord that cuts corners to save a few bucks.

It’s always in the best interest of a tenant to get a good landlord. Why? Well, for plenty of reasons, but mainly so tenants aren’t left with cold water for months on end, rotting windows and leaking pipes. A good landlord is essential for a comfortable living experience- which tenant doesn’t want that?

Here are my top tips on how to spot a good landlord:

IMPORTANT

1] The good landlord will comply with all their legal obligations, which includes, but not limited to, supplying a valid gas safety certificate and Energy Performance Certificate (EPC).

2] The good landlord will take and secure the deposit in a Tenancy Deposit Scheme and provide all the relevant details relating to the deposit scheme used.

3] The good landlord will ask for references from employers and/or previous landlords.

4] The good landlord will use a up-to-date written Tenancy Agreement contract.

5] The good landlord will be friendly and won’t come across as an arrogant pompous-arse prick.

6] The good landlord will ask for proof of ID.

7] The good landlord will fix any broken appliances and attend to any repairs BEFORE any contracts are signed.

8] The good landlord will have smoke alarms in the property.

9] The good landlord will be on time and keep appointments.

CAUTIOUS

1] The good landlord would have made an effort to make the property clean and presentable for viewings. If the property looks like shit, feels like shit, and smells like shit, the tenant can take a stab in the dark and assume the landlord is…

2] The good landlord will have a valid landlord building insurance policy.

3] The good landlord will offer a 6-12 month agreement if the tenant and landlord are complete strangers to one another. Anything else would be weird and irresponsible.

4] The good landlord will be easily contactable and quickly responsive before, during and after any viewings.

5] The good landlord will require a Tenant Guarantor.

6] The good landlord will draw up an Inventory Form.

7] The good landlord will request a Tenant Credit Check

GOOD SIGNS

1] The good landlord will know the details of the companies currently supplying the utilities e.g. Gas, electricity, and water.

2] The good landlord will know the property’s tax band and monthly rate.

3] The good landlord will ask if the tenant smokes.

4] The good landlord will ask if the tenant has any pets.

5] The good landlord reads this website and enjoys it.

Conclusion

I’ve put each point under a level of importance according to my personal beliefs and expectations. Of course, other landlords/tenants may rate the points differently.

The beauty about the points listed above is that they can ALL be answered BEFORE any contracts are signed. That’s useful for obvious reasons, but primarily to help inform tenants on whether their prospective landlord is a scumbag or not.

Almost certainly, if a landlord doesn’t adhere to all the points in the IMPORTANT section, the tenant should run a mile and not look back unless 1) they have a shotgun in their hand 2) the landlord is ridiculously hot and slutty looking.

Gimme some mo’

Have you got any more “good landlord” guidelines? If so, hit me with them…

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11 Comments- Join The Conversation...

Guest Avatar
Maze 2nd November, 2010 @ 09:26

Hi , love the site.

2 questions if you can help please ?

- is it worth getting special landlord insurance, if so what kind ?
- is it a legal requirement to have mains fed smoke alarms ?

Many thanks

1
The Landlord Avatar
The Landlord 2nd November, 2010 @ 10:34

Hi Maze,

Many thanks!

1) You don't necessary need "special" landlord insurance, but your insurance provider needs to be aware that you're letting your property out and your tenant will be the resident. If you don't inform your insurance provider, they may reject any claims!

2) The building regulations require that all properties built after June 1992 must have a mains operated inter-connected smoke alarms fitted on every level of the property.

Hope that helps

2
Guest Avatar
Aunty P 2nd November, 2010 @ 12:55

Hope lots of prospective tenants read this, it could save a lot hassle later. Nice post. :-)

3
Guest Avatar
eleri 3rd November, 2010 @ 21:23

A good landlord will ask the tenant to let her/him know immediately there is a problem, and will fix it immediately.

A good landlord will ask the prospective tenant, who usually has a large expensive telly, if the would-be tenant owns a Hoover, and, if not,will insist that the tenant gets one before moving in so that the new carpet has a chance of being cleaned!

4
Guest Avatar
Fredo 19th November, 2010 @ 18:34

If the building is older than 1992, I wouldn't expect mains operated smoke alarms. The cost of installing one would be excessive given that most people have the battery ones in their homes and are happy enough to change the battery once in a while. Building Regs only apply to new buildings, so it's not breaking any rules.

That's just my opinion, maybe you know something more about why the battery ones aren't so good - I'd be interested to know if you do.

5
Guest Avatar
sam fry 9th December, 2010 @ 10:03

what if the property is let through an agency? then the first impression is of the agent and not the landlord??
sam fry xx

6
Guest Avatar
Belle 10th January, 2012 @ 15:18

According to your view here, seems I have a scumbag landlord. There's no seems about it. He IS a scumbag. Our agents are clearly about him not tenancy as despite paying for renewal, we've been given a notice to quit, but all we signed was a little "yes we want to renew" form so council is seeing if we have a case. :/ The agents have gotten nasty about it too. Oh not to mention landlords refusal to get rid of the MOLD growing on the walls. Numerous posessions became green and furry. We've been here 6 months. :|

7
Guest Avatar
mal 12th February, 2012 @ 11:07

is it normal for a landlord who i regarded as a friend who also looked upon me as a good tenant and lives just next door to drop through my letterbox another rent agreement increasing the rent by &100 a month and hasn't spoken since, two weeks back. To start 01/03/12.

8
Guest Avatar
Jeremy 12th February, 2012 @ 15:31

Hello Mal,

No it's not normal. Also the legal way to increase the rent is via the prescribed legal form. So do some more reading of The Landlord's blogs here and see if you are entitled to refuse the increase until it is communicated to you in the right, legal, way.

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Guest Avatar
Steve 14th March, 2014 @ 16:55

So my roof in my bedroom is leaking and falling apart.i told my landlord last year about it when it happened and he just shruged it of and said ithhappens everyware this time of year and i have to wait till it passes.then he just patched itup a couple weeks later when it dryed abit.and now spring is here and guess what?its doing it again.and all i get is the same b.s. I told hime he has to fix the roof.i told him to clear of the roof from the snow and he did nothing.it bad enough i have no heat in the attic he calls a bedroom but my second bedroom for the second year is leaking and now im worried about mold.i have 2 bedrooms and none are usable and when i threaten rent he threatens to write me up..im lost he is a jerk.he bought me a small heater for my 1 room (the attic) but when i use it it blows the fuse so i have to go out side and downstairs to the neibours and flick it on.i mean i cant even use the heater cause it always blows the fuse.always.so im renting a 2 bedroom that i cant even properly use one.

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twyla jeffries 9th April, 2014 @ 00:45

I have been renting this house for several years and put 2000.00 of my own money to try fix what I could afford windows are so old they are falling litterly out porch is concrete is falling apart with a huge hole and they have not try to fix it can't afford to up and move and they promised to fix things but blow it off and take my money.I think if I turn them in I know they will condemned the home do I have the right to not pay rent till they fix things please respond I need guidance

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